Getting Through Our Supply Of Red Onions

grow red onions

I am a lover of all things Garlic and Onion.

I can never understand when someone doesn’t like these two vegetables, because to me, they are heaven. The flavours, the smells, and that extra something they add to a dish.

When we use Garlic, we use a lot. And I’ve been known to add Onions to a recipe, even when it isn’t usual, or suggested (like adding Red Onion to our Caesar salads).

So of course along with our awesome Garlic plot, I also planted a pretty good supply of Red Onions. We have two full garden beds of them and I would say we have at least 100 bulbs in the garden happily growing.

Which is extremely fortuitous right now because I have had an intense craving for them!

I’ve always loved red onions, right from the moment my Mum introduced me to eating them raw on Red Onion and Tomato sandwiches.

But now that I am pregnant, I love them even more! Red onion and Tomato sandwiches have been my go to food. They certainly helped when I was struggling with morning sickness, but even now that I’m feeling much better in the 2nd trimester (if not totally ravenous), I still want my daily fix of these pungent little (or not so little) bulbs.

It’s been so wonderful to go and pull up another fresh, fat bulb from the garden when I need one. Even more so because for some reason, no matter the season, Red Onions are never cheap to buy in the stores and they tend to be small and often bruised.

So I am happily making my way through our personal supply instead.

The great thing about Onions is that you can store them in the ground until you need them, so even if my craving ebbs and I don’t get through all 100+ bulbs, then we can keep them safely in the soil until we are ready to use them or harvest them all.

We’ve fattened our bulbs up with lots of water, and the many hot days we’ve had have helped them to develop their colour and flavour. The other secret was filling the beds with a healthy mix of fresh home made compost a few months before planting out all our little onion seedlings.

We dropped in quite a lot of seed too, to make sure we had enough germinate, and thankfully after a few weeks we had lots of lovely little bunches of Red Onion seedlings to thin and transplant.

I’m a bit of a softy when it comes to the thinning, and I try to save every single transplant if I can. Which means a lots of plucking apart and planting, and a lot of Onions at the end : )

Red Onions, in fact Onions in general, are another easy to grow crop, requiring only the standard water, weed and feed maintenance, so there’s no reason not to give them a try. Just make sure you have the space to spare while they each grow into their lovely round little perfection and to allow them to sit until you are ready to use them.

Get growing!

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